Unusual Joinery Detail found in Bellefontaine Barn

During the recent JBD workshop in Bellefontaine, Ohio, we came across a pretty interesting joinery detail. It is similar to Jan Lewandoski’s description of a tying joint variation in the Timber Framers Guild “Joinery & Design Workbook”. Illustrated by Jack Sobon, it describes a bridle joint with necked tie-beam and extended shoulders. The double tenons in the Longbrake-Smith barn, circa 1870’s go clear through the scarfed eave plate and stand 4″ proud of the plate. It then has approx. 1″ pegs that help secure the scarf in its orientation and seemingly prevent outward rotation of the plate by the downward forces of the roof… very unusual!

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Pictures from the recent Upper Arlington Sunny 95 Barn Raising

25 hearty souls came to Upper Arlington for the 10 day workshop to restore Arlington’s oldest remaining timber frame barn and erect a new doug-fir frame for The Community Foundation of Upper Arlington. It was a fantastic time had by all…one of the highlights being the time we all spent with the elementary school kids next door at Greensview.

The frames went up without a hitch, and the community, and Friends of Ohio Barns has something to be proud of!

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2nd JBD Training Workshop was held 6 Nov. 2010 near Bellefontaine

This training workshop is designed to further educate volunteer barn enthusiasts who are willing to then go out into their own respective Ohio communities and assist owners and stewards of older barns. The objective is to help them understand preservation and maintenance techniques, available resources and use options, and hopefully build a greater appreciation for their particular grand old structure.

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If you have any JBD Workshop or Program related questions or comments please visit the JBD Program page on our site. If you have further questions contact Paul Knobel via email, or contact us via phone at 330-882-5027 or 330-715-7422. For general FOB related questions we can best be reached at our regular mailing address – Friends of Ohio Barns, P.O. Box 203, Burbank, Oh 44214.

2010 FOB Fall Picnic was Held at Slate Run

Friends of Ohio Barns had their picnic at Slate Run Living Historical Farm last fall. This 1880’s farmstead has been restored and is operated by Columbus Metro Parks as a working farm. Farmhands and homemakers are in period dress.

Every farm animal you can think of is found in the barn or around the farmyard. Percheron horses, dairy cows, pigs, sheep, turkeys, chickens, ducks, geese and a number of other kinds of fowl make up the extended family on the farm.

The big barn, a granary and the summer kitchen are some of the timber frame structures that stand out among the dozen or so farm buildings. The root cellar is stocked with canned vegetables and the smoke house has several select cuts hanging from the rafters. A blacksmith shop, a broom shop and several tool sheds are loaded with all of the implements of farming in that time period. The windmill towers over the haystack.

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The vegetable garden, grape arbor, orchard, corn field and sorghum patch are all showing signs of abundance as harvest time approaches. Onions are drying on racks by the summer kitchen. In spite of the world economy and the global financial crisis, Slate Run demonstrates that life on a productive subsistence farm can be separate and apart from the bigger mess

Slate Run is more than a working historical farm. It is 1700 acres of forests and fields and wetlands rolling over the glacial till plain. Extensive open water areas and the edge between forests and field provide an abundance of wildlife habitat. A spotted fawn grazes along the roadside. Green and great blue, and night herons can be seen stalking along the marshy borders. Footpaths roam over and through the wooded hills that are old glacial deposits.

Other timber frames at the park include the entry to the historic farm which was raised by a workshop of the Timber Framer’s Guild a decade ago and a shelter house recently built by Amish craftsmen. For directions and more information on the park, check out www.friendsofslaterunfarm.org

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